A review of “After the Sunset” by Jeanne Aufmuth

 

Stars: **

Rating: PG-13 for sexuality, violence and language

Run Time: 1 hour, 33 minutes

 

 

Pierce Brosnan should bite the bullet and stick to what he knows: the suave stylings of 007.  Sunset is a throwaway not worthy of his ample charms.

Nice job if you can get it.  Max Burdett (Brosnan) and gal pal Lola Cirillo (Salma Hayek) are high-end jewel thieves who pull off their final heist by snatching a huge diamond en-route to a high security vault accompanied by FBI Agent Stanley Lloyd (Woody Harrelson).

After a job well done it’s a pat on the back a la sun and fun on the spectacular island of Nassau in the Bahamas.  The plan is to kick back and revel in the leisurely pace of island living.  A little snorkeling, some scuba, and perhaps some wedding vows.

Lloyd has different plans for the lazy lovebirds. Shunned by the FBI and with bruised ego intact, Lloyd follows the lawless pair to their exotic hideaway, positive that Max won’t be able to resist one last heist. One of Napoleon’s infamous dazzling diamonds is making the rounds of the Caribbean on a luxury cruise ship that just happens to be making port at Nassau.

A series of silly snafus and peripheral characters turn this potential smart-sell into a banal trifle.  The local detective (the gorgeous Naomie Harris) falls for Lloyd and agrees to partner with him (both in and out of the sack) to nab the bad guys.  Don Cheadle plays it straight (but shouldn’t) as island kingpin Henri Moore, who wants a piece of the priceless gemstone in order to fund the vital growth of his island infrastructure.

The look is hypnotically lush but swaying palms and crystal waters aren’t enough to get the job done.  Brosnan and Hayek generate a touch of easy chemistry as do Brosnan and Harrelson, who pick off most of the laughs from a dumbed-down script.  Hayek’s voluptuous bod is a key player, the camera caressing her curvy backside and ample cleavage every chance it gets. Homophobic humor is meant to appeal to the lowest common denominator.